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June 2021

CBD & Pregnancy

By Articles

With the popularity of CBD oil growing, the reported benefits of this have grown as well. Benefits include minimizing pain, nausea, anxiety, and insomnia, providing postpartum relief, and more – all common symptoms of pregnancy.

When nausea and aches hit, you may wonder if you can continue with your pre-pregnancy CBD routine. The overarching consensus is to avoid all CBD use during your pregnancy, and while breastfeeding. We’ll break down how experts arrived at this recommendation below.

Before you read on, we know numerous moms have used CBD oil throughout their pregnancy, and immediately following. And, due to the minimal traces of CBD that can be transferred through breast milk, and the lack of research available, this may be something you are actively considering using. If this is something you are contemplating, discuss it with your doctor or healthcare provider first to gather all the information and determine a plan.

What is CBD oil? 

If you haven’t heard of CBD oil, you’ll hear about it soon. CBD oil doesn’t contain THC and doesn’t give you the “high” that most cannabis does. To make our CBD oil at Oregon Hemp CBD, we use a cold extraction process to refine our hemp flower into an oil form.

What are the risks associated with using CBD oil during pregnancy? 

The use of CBD oil during pregnancy, or while breastfeeding, has not been widely researched and more research needs to be conducted. The research that is in place, is tied to marijuana products so experts believe CBD oil will have the same effects, despite the lack of specific research. Because of this, the FDA advises against using CBD oil during pregnancy. They cite this as a huge cause for concern because there is a chance, like marijuana, it could be dangerous to your child’s development. In general, CBD has known risks such as extreme sleepiness, liver damage, and harmful interactions with other drugs and the FDA worries that there are many more risks that we aren’t aware of quite yet.

When CBD was researched with pregnant animals, those animals had problems with the reproductive system of their developing male fetuses. It’ll take time to fully gather substantial research specific to CBD, but the FDA is looking to expand their findings and examine how similar the risks are to THC. The FDA worries that since THC can enter a fetus’ brain from the bloodstream of their mother, CBD could run this risk as well. Like THC, CBD could also have the potential of increasing the risk of your child having a low birth weight, premature birth, or even stillbirth.

What are the risks associated with using CBD oil while breastfeeding?  

While some moms may consider CBD oil during pregnancy to combat pregnancy symptoms, new moms may turn to it to relieve stress or postpartum depression. Like during pregnancy, the use of CBD oil while breastfeeding is not FDA recommended. While breastfeeding, the FDA believes that CBD will inevitably be transferred to the baby through some quantity of breast milk.

The “pump and dump” method doesn’t work either because through other marijuana research, those cannabis products that were used days or weeks before breastfeeding, still found their way into breast milk.

The FDA is looking to research more about this topic such as to what extent does the presence of CBD in milk harms the baby or the mother’s milk production. The FDA is also looking at how THC affects a child while breastfeeding and is cautious that CBD may have those same effects. If a baby is exposed to THC through breastmilk, they can experience issues with brain development such as hyperactivity or poor cognitive function. And since certain medications can be passed onto babies through breastmilk, the FDA worries this could also happen with CBD.

The biggest risk with using CBD during pregnancy or while breastfeeding is that there is no research on the short-or long-term effects and it could affect your child’s brain development.

Has the FDA ever approved any form of a CBD product? 

Many feel that because CBD is unregulated by the FDA, it is a red flag. Without the FDA’s regulation, there is much uncertainty around if CBD is safe and effective to treat diseases, what dosage is safe, how it works in partnership with other drugs, and other safety concerns or dangerous side effects.

Since CBD oil doesn’t need FDA approval to go to market., you then run the risk of purchasing CBD products that have been contaminated with harmful substances. This is another reason why you might want to stay clear of this while pregnant or breastfeeding. At Oregon Hemp CBD though, you can be sure our CBD oil is only the highest quality. All our oils are produced on our small family farm and are third-party tested.

Given the risks and limited research, we recognize this is a personal decision that varies for everyone. We, at Oregon Hemp CBD, are available to help you navigate our CBD oil collection when you’re ready to resume using our CBD oils.

[Sources:]

https://americanpregnancy.org/healthy-pregnancy/is-it-safe/cbd-oil-during-pregnancy-75586/

https://www.fda.gov/consumers/consumer-updates/what-you-should-know-about-using-cannabis-including-cbd-when-pregnant-or-breastfeeding

https://www.parents.com/baby/breastfeeding/cbd-and-breastfeeding-is-it-safe/

https://www.chicagotribune.com/marijuana/sns-tft-pregnancy-cbd-breastfeeding-20200519-csiwoq4zfzhcnkpy4n7zspob7u-story.html

https://www.mydosage.com/cbd-guide/cbd-during-pregnancy-and-breastfeeding

https://www.healthline.com/health-news/fda-says-to-not-use-cbd-thc-products-while-breastfeeding

 

Why You Should Always Check Your CBD Product’s COA

By Articles

Not all hemp products are made alike. With the rising popularity of CBD, many unscrupulous companies are marketing hemp and other oils as therapeutics — but these products often have little to no benefit.

So, how can you identify legitimate products? All CBD companies are required to obtain a Certificate of Analysis (COA) for each of their products. These aren’t always made available to their customers. As a responsible consumer, it’s up to you to review a product’s COA. Here’s how to read this technical document and identify high-quality CBD products.

Beyond the packaging: Is that CBD product safe?

Opportunistic CBD companies are quick to label their products as real CBD, free of THC and potent enough to have health benefits. Unfortunately, this young industry isn’t consistently regulated, which allows fake CBD products to come into the market. Other products don’t meet the (few) federal standards for CBD products or make claims that are not FDA-approved.

Consumers who aren’t fully educated on CBD products may inadvertently purchase:

  • “CBD” products that are actually hempseed oil — which does not contain cannabidiol — or worse, dangerous synthetic cannabinoids
  • Highly diluted tinctures with only trace amounts of CBD
  • Products that contain more than the federal limit of 0.3% THC for non-prescription hemp products
  • CBD sourced from hemp that is grown with lots of pesticides or processed in facilities with pathogens or heavy metals

Some companies attempt to maximize profits by cutting corners on production or even masquerading non-CBD oils as authentic, properly sourced hemp products. In best-case scenarios, these products are simply a waste of money. Worst-case, they can cause unwanted psychoactive effects or toxic side effects.

If you’re wondering if fake or poorly crafted CBD products are really that common… they are. A JAMA study found that 70% of product labels misrepresented the actual chemical composition. Keep in mind that many CBD companies don’t have an internal laboratory. They may also source their hemp from what they believe is a sustainable source. So when reviewing a potential CBD product, know that even detailed labels may not tell the whole story.

That’s where the COA comes in.

How a Certificate of Analysis can help

A Certificate of Analysis (COA) is a verified laboratory report of a hemp product’s chemical composition. It also includes safety screenings to check for heavy metals and other contaminants. Even if a CBD company seems to be above-board, it’s always a good idea to ask for the COA.

The COA documents several key characteristics of legal, safe CBD products:

  • Less than 0.3% THC. Everything from improper harvesting to the fraudulent use of cannabis plants rather than the domesticated industrial hemp. (Note: While full-spectrum CBD products do contain THC, the ratio must be below 0.3%.)
  • The ratio of CBD to the carrier oil or other medium. This describes the product’s potency. A COA will also list the “Action Level” of the product, which indicates whether it’s within safe consumption levels.
  • The absence of pathogens, heavy metals, chemical solvents, and mycotoxins.

Note that because CBD is harvested and processed in batches, you can and should obtain the COA for each batch. Always check that the COA’s batch matches the batch listed on your product. Some unscrupulous companies will get the labs done on legitimate products, then start cutting corners but keeping handing out the old COAs.

What happens if you consume a fake or unsafe CBD product?

You may be wondering: is it really necessary to do all this homework before buying some CBD gummies? Yes, absolutely. Due to patchwork legal guidance, unregulated processing plants, and potential cross-contamination with other botanicals including THC-rich cannabis, it’s easy for subpar products to get into the market. As we mentioned, 70% of tested products had substantially lower levels of CBD than advertised, and some were substantially higher to the point of being unsafe.

If you consume a CBD product that was manufactured unsafely or that contains THC, you could experience:

  • Unwanted intoxication by and illegal possession of THC. If a product measures above 0.3% THC, it is automatically classified as Schedule 1 cannabis, not hemp.
  • Bacterial infection, usually by Listeria. This can cause severe intestinal distress, flu-like symptoms, and even seizures.
  • Heavy metal contamination. Regular consumption of arsenic, mercury, lead, and cadmium can lead to infertility, cognitive issues, psychosis, and even organ failure.

We’re not trying to scare you but rather keep you safe so you can enjoy the benefits of CBD worry-free. Here’s how to read a COA to be sure your desired product is safe and legal.

The anatomy of a COA

A COA is basically a lab report that can be daunting to read. Here’s how to find the most important information.

  1. Start at the top and find the laboratory name. Make sure that the laboratory is not associated with the CBD company; it should be a third-party independent analysis.
  2. Check that the batch number and testing date match what’s listed on your product.
  3. Scan the QR code, if available, to verify the COA and make sure it wasn’t altered.
  4. Head down to “Cannabinoid Profile.” Here’s where you can check that THC is below 0.3% and that CBD is high enough to have an effect (usually about 17-20%). In addition to the percentage result, the COA will also list the weight of the product (usually displayed as mg/g or mg/mL).
  5. You’ll also see a bunch of other cannabinoids, including CBN, CBG, and CBC. These substances have specific effects such as anti-insomnia, anti-inflammatory, and antidepressant benefits, respectively. So if you’re buying a product to help relieve insomnia but your COA says the product is very low in CBN, it may not have the effects you want.
  6. Check the Heavy Metal and Pesticide Analysis sections. The COA will list the allowable limits and what the product actually contains, then give a pass/fail determination. Obviously, look for “pass” across the board.
  7. Review the Terpenes Profile. Terpenes are the plant-derived aromatics that enhance a product’s taste, smell, and sometimes benefits as well. As with the cannabinoids themselves, different terpenes have different properties. Check that your product will have the synergistic benefits you want. For example, valencene and eucalyptus can boost CBD’s anti-inflammatory effects while terpinolene has antioxidant properties.

After you’ve reviewed the COA, remember that a product’s potency varies by how it’s consumed. For example, a package advertising 1000 mg CBD may not actually contain that amount. The COA is a better indication of the actual amount of cannabidiol you’re buying. Multiply the mg/g or mg/mL of the volume listed on the package. For example, if you purchase a 30mL bottle of CBD tincture and the COA says the weight is 40mg/mL, the bottle contains 1200 mg of CBD.

Wrapping up

We hope you’ve found this guide useful. As part of our commitment to making hemp products safe and sustainable, we’re eager to help educate consumers on this emerging industry. Should you have any questions about our products, please do request the Certificate of Analysis so you can make an informed decision.

 

 

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